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Tiffany Table Lamps
Our recommended store offers Tiffany Lamps for best prices, best Customer Support and largest collection. You can click below link to browse selection:
PREVIEW:
Blossom Faux Olive Butterfly
 
Branch Blueleaf Pillar Luminaira
 
Scallop Art Glass Gotham Indus
 
 
 
Testimonials
I actually read the book AFTER I'd seen the movie and the book of course adds much more detail (there's only so much you can squash into a two-hour movie). The book is a wonderful read for kids and adults alike. Harry is a loveable, loving, endearing character and I like how sweet and polite he is. I loved the scene where at the zoo; parts of it was funny. It was touching, though, how Harry had empathy for the poor snake and it was cute how he says softly, "It's annoying, I know, having stupid people banging..." (Dudley & Vernon pound on the glass of the cage and in the movie, Harry gets sick of it and tells them, "He's asleep!") The Dursleys reminded me of many narrow-minded, judgemental people I've encountered in the world, including people who feel threatened by those who are "different" (Harry's awful aunt and uncle call him "strange and abnormal" in a very cruel way right to his face). J.K. did a wonderful job creating little Harry, right down to the glasses and thick, dark, rather unkempt hair. Tiffany table lamps, Apparently the reviewer who said didn't like Harry and claimed that he "became self-centered and unwilling to follow rules and expects Dumbledore to save his butt" and "treated rivals badly" didn't get the depth of Harry's character. Harry is the LEAST self-centered character I've ever read about; the only rules he breaks is maybe being out of bed at night (a rule not really strictly enforced at Hogwarts)

The times Tiffany does get into trouble (most kids do from time to time, he accepts the consequences willingly, even if it means serving detention with Malfoy for a weekend. Harry NEVER mistreats his rivals; he just refuses to butter Malfoy up. Harry's reasons for sneaking out of bed at night reflects his deep caring for his fellow students and for the future of Hogwarts; it's not just idle curiosity that he's creeping around the restricted section of the library at night (in the movie, he's so frightened he swallows when he almost runs into Snape and Filch). The ending was sooo sweet and touching when he's recovering from his confrontation with Voldemort and Dumbledore comes to visit and tells him about his mum's great love for him and saved him and Harry is overwhelmed with emotion and can't hold back the tears (a scene they unfortunately deleted from the movie, which I wish they'd included). I could picture Dumbledore holding his hand as he cried, then took off his glasses and wiped his eyes. I like how each of the Hogwarts Houses were described; the Slytherins weren't necessarily meant to be all-evil; they were noted for "cunning" which could be either a good or a bad trait. It was Malfoy and some of his cronies that brought down that particular house. It was good to see Tiffany lamp, Ron, and Hermione recognized for their courage, even if they did have to skulk around to do it. I think if anything, the book teaches that sometimes kids won't always do the expected thing, but 90 percent of the time, it's for a good reason, not because they're just being "bad." The book delves more into the psychology of the characters. I can't wait to read the other books; I do hope they have more of Ginny Weasley in it; she'd make a good companion for Hermione and Tiffany lamps.

 
 
 

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